I find it really hard to explain feelings to my 3 year old when the topic comes up. Why does that make you sad Mum, or why does that make you smile are really hard questions for me to be able to answer in a way that she understands. So when we were given a copy of Smile Cry by Tania McCartney & Jess Racklyeft I knew from the first page it would be a hit, and it’s been on repeat at bedtime since then.

Smile Cry (a beginner book of feelings) is the story of cat, piglet and bunny and the different scenarios that make them smile or cry. From “ice-cream plopping” cries to “a tutu in the wash” cries (oh this one in particular is SOOOOO relevant for my house) then FLIP the book and we get to read about “cosy under the blanket” smiles to “spinning round and round” smiles.

Really cute illustrations, easy to read pages, and lots of opportunities to stop and talk about the different things that make us happy and sad is why I love this book. Perfect for ages 3-6 would be a great learning to read book.

BUY IT HERE FROM BOOKTOPIA

smile cry book

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