As the warmer weather is approaching and we are able to enjoy our parks and beaches again I want to explore two of my favourite things…art and mindfulness! We can create art anywhere! It is such a great medium to allow us to be ‘present’ or ‘in the moment’ as we are thinking and concentrating on creating, allowing the pace of the world to just slow down.

So welcome to the first part of Mindfulness in Art!

Nature Mandalas

A Mandala is a Sanskrit word meaning ‘Circle’ and represents harmony and balance. Nature mandalas can be made anywhere, with anything! I was lucky enough to spend some time on the beautiful Kangaroo Island in the holidays and collected shells and plants with my boys to create mandalas on the beach.

 

You need to start at the centre and place your collections in a pattern, from the middle and working out to the sides. As my canvas was huge (the whole beach) I just needed to decide when it looked balanced and in harmony.

During this quiet time, we were also able to observe (due to the silent time) a pair of nesting oyster catchers quietly going about their business of sitting on their nest…it was just beautiful!

We then took images of our mandalas and left them there to slowly dissipate with time back to the elements.

Just a beautiful and fun experience with my boys!

Please post images of your Nature Mandalas and share them with our Kids in Adelaide community!

You might also be interested in

  • We explored Mindfulness in Art with our last instalment on Kids in Adelaide with Nature Mandalas, with objects collected from the beach and the dunes. Thanks for the great images that came in with your beautiful mandalas…..amazing!! In this instalment of Mindfulness in Art we are using all the beautiful shells we collected for our nature mandala to create a mobile. A project like this is even more satisfying when you are on holidays, creating beautiful memories and you can bring home an artwork to hang on your walls forever! You will need the following: * Shells from the beach – it is so much easier to collect shells that already have a small hole already in them…. * Small metal skewer for poking holes, or even a thick darning needle or tiny screwdriver (Mum’s you will need to do the hole creating as this is an extremely hard task….not so much mindfulness in this part, just patience!!!) * Piece of drift wood * Fishing wire * Scissors Have all of your beautiful shells cleaned and dry. Talk with your child about the type of pattern you would like to create with your shells. We used 4 lines with three…

  • Children’s artistic development follows a predictable sequence, especially when it comes to creating lines and marks on a page. From 18 months of age to 4 years, children begin to draw random scribbles. These become more controlled and move into circular scribbles, and then eventually form a circle. From 4 to 7 years, the circle becomes extended with lines and other shapes and becomes ‘me’, or everything around the child, which tells their story. Making marks and creating lines can be heaps of fun for children to do, if we start thinking about it differently. A piece of art can even be created that you could proudly hang on the wall due to its abstract elements and perfect sense of design. Here’s how…. I used an A3 piece of card in this demonstration BUT suggest you go to an art store (Art to Art, Premier Art Supplies or Eckersleys) and pick up a piece of pre-painted canvas. I have used black in the past and it looks AMAZING with fluorescent colours on it. A full metre will cost you approximately $30, which means you could make heaps as presents for your loved ones! Grab a selection of bright acrylic colours…

  • We explored Mindfulness in Art with our last instalment on Kids in Adelaide with the Shell Mobiles you created from your slow walks along the beach…or fast walks if your children are smaller and faster! In this instalment of Mindfulness in Art we are using nothing but our own bodies and our imaginations. This activity can be used from children as young as three to your teenagers, boy or girl! Regardless of age, it is engaging and teaches the pattern as a visual element of art through the slow and repetitious repeating structure of line and form. This echoes the elements of an artwork to communicate a sense of balance, rhythm and movement. My 13 year old son created the following art work and found the experience satisfying and soothing, especially with his favourite music playing in the background. Children in the art room from Reception to Year 6 also find this activity engaging and the noise levels drop rapidly as they all start focusing on patterns and colours. Bliss! You will need the following: * A pencil and eraser for drafting, * A thin black F-pen or something similar for the outlines, * Pencils or textas for colouring, *…